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INTRODUCTION
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
NOTATIONAL CONVENTIONS
UNTRACED MANUSCRIPTS
SCRIBE B=ADAM PINKHURST
SCRIBE D=JOHN MARCHAUNT
THE HAMMOND SCRIBE
THE “HOOKED-g” SCRIBES
THE PETWORTH SCRIBE
THE BERYN SCRIBE
BIBLIOGRAPHY
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A Digital Catalogue of the
Pre-1500 Manuscripts and Incunables of the
Canterbury Tales
Second Edition
SCRIBE B=ADAM PINKHURST/PYNKHURST
The scribe formerly known as “Scribe B” (so named by Doyle and Parkes 1978) has been identified by Linne R. Mooney as Adam Pinkhurst. Mooney believes Pinkhurst was from Surrey, and that he worked as a textwriter for the Mercers’ Company and/or the mercer John Organ. Organ also worked at the Customhouse where his service overlapped with that of Geoffrey Chaucer from 21 June 1376-14 December 1386.note Pinkurst’s hand has been identified in the following:
1. A Petition of the Folk of Mercerye (1387-88) (The National Archives, Public Record Office 8/20/997; ed. in Chambers and Daunt, 33-37. Identified by Mooney 2006 (facsimiles).
2. Trinity College, Cambridge, MS B.15.17 of Langland’s Piers Plowman.note
3. Hg (National Library of Wales MS Peniarth 392D, Canterbury Tales; cf. Ramsey 1982, 1986)
4. El (Huntington Library MS 26 C 9, Canterbury Tales; cf. Ramsey 1982, 1986)
5. Cambridge University Library MS Kk.1.3 (20) [Kk] (single leaf of PrT; Doyle 1995, pp. 60-62, facscimiles)
6. The Hatfield House “Cecil Fragment” of Troilus and Criseyde (see Campbell 1958; Doyle 1995, pp. 58-9, facsimile; Mooney 2006, figs. 2A and 2B)
7. Qq [2-4] of Trinity College, Cambridge MS R.3.2 of Gower’s Confessio Amantis (Doyle and Parkes 1978)
8. Aberystwyth, National Library of Wales, MS Peniarth 393D of Boethius (Stubbs 2002)
The text hand is of the anglicana formata type representative of the latter half of the fourteenth century, with double-compartment a (cf. the hand of Kk and Trinity, however, where the secretary a is preferred), looped ascenders on b and d, 8-shaped g and word-final s, “tilted” y. The text headings are written in either a larger anglicana script, or in a hybrid anglicana.
One of the primary distinctions between Pinkhurst’s work in Hg and El (as noted by Hanna 1989, p. 8) is that in El ascenders in the top lines, running heads, explicits and incipits, and elsewhere where space allows, extend much higher than usual and are frequently topped by an ornamental, c-shaped hook. The scribe’s long r in El, in final position, often closes with a counter-clockwise loop, a feature absent in the scribe’s work elsewhere. El as a whole is more carefully planned and executed than Hg, and as part of this the scribe employs “a graded system of litterae notabiliores and paragraph marks” (Doyle and Parkes 1978, p. 187). Finally, one might take note of the more highly calligraphic quality of the scribe’s hand in El than Hg, with a duct at once slightly more angular and yet more supple than in Hg. In other respects, the hand can be described as in Hg, a variety of anglicana formata dated to the end of the fourteenth century and the early fifteenth century.
LANGUAGE
LALME LP 6400, London. Labeled “Type III” by Samuels (1983, p. 24), and localized in London, the language is identical in most respects to that of El (cf. Ramsey 1982, 1986, and the replies to Ramsey: Samuels 1983 and Smith 1988). With the addition of Trinity College, Cambridge, MS B.15.17 and “A Petition of the Folk of Mercerye” to the Pinkhurst catalogue—meaning that most of Samuel’s examples of Type III are by the same scribe—Horobin and Mooney raise serious questions about the validity of Type III as a category of London English. For detailed analyses of Pynkhurst’s spellings, see Smith 1995 and Horobin and Mooney 2004, pp. 73-92, Horobin 2003, chapters 2 and 3, as well as the references cited earlier in this section.