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INTRODUCTION
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
NOTATIONAL CONVENTIONS
UNTRACED MANUSCRIPTS
SCRIBE B=ADAM PINKHURST
SCRIBE D=JOHN MARCHAUNT
THE HAMMOND SCRIBE
THE “HOOKED-g” SCRIBES
THE PETWORTH SCRIBE
THE BERYN SCRIBE
BIBLIOGRAPHY
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A Digital Catalogue of the
Pre-1500 Manuscripts and Incunables of the
Canterbury Tales
Second Edition
SCRIBE D=JOHN MARCHAUNT
Mooney and Stubbs identify Doyle and Parkes’ “Scribe D” as the hand of John Marchaunt, “Chamber Clerk, 1380-00, Common Clerk, 1399-1417 (Chapter 3). A deed making reference to “Release by Richard Osbarn, Henry Hert, citizens of London, Henry Jolypace and Thomas Preston, clerks, to John Marchaunt son of Nicholas Marchaunt, late citizen of London, of their right in two tenements…” would seem to identify John Marchaunt as a Londoner (PRO vol. 4 [1902], 156, A.7355 [dated in London 19 January, 5 Henry V]). In addition to the Ha⁴ and Cp MSS of the CT, this hand copied the following:
1. London, University Library MS V. 88 (Piers Plowman)
2. British Library MS Additional 27944 (Trevisa’s translation of Bartholomaeus Anglicus’s De Proprietatibus Rerum)
3. British Library MS Egerton 294 (Confessio Amantis)
4. Bodleian MS 902 (Confessio Amantis, fols. 2r-16v)
5. Bodleian MS 294 (Confessio Amantis)
6. Corpus Christi College, Oxford MS 67 (Confessio Amantis)
7. Trinity College, Oxford MS R.3.2 (Confessio Amantis; Qq [9], [14] (from fol. 113v, the final recto of Q [14], [15-19])
8. Christ Church, Oxford MS 148 (Confessio Amantis )
9. Columbia University Library MS Plimpton 265 (Confessio Amantis)
10. Princeton University Library, Taylor MS 5 (fols. 9r-193r; Confessio Amantis)note
The scribe writes a variety of anglicana formata common in England in the first part of the fifteenth century. Doyle and Parkes suggest Scribe Δ as a close analogue of Scribe D (1978, Appendix B), but the two hands are relatively easy to distinguish from each other, especially if one adds spelling as one of the criteria applied. Scribe D’s hand is very upright and maintains a consistent, even letter height. The minim strokes regularly terminate above the ruled lines, allowing most descenders to terminate at the line. The scribe does employ several secretary forms, including short r and B-shaped final s. 2-shaped r occurs in ligature with preceding o. Open e is horned, as is the 8-shaped g. Yogh and thorn are common.
LANGUAGE
The language of Scribe D has been discussed extensively by Smith (1983; 1985, 1:216-231, 2:516-542; 1988; 1988), who has identified the scribe’s characteristic spellings as including: “ych ‘EACH’, ony and any ‘ ANY’, þouh ‘THOUGH’, silf ‘SELF’, nough etc. ‘NOT’, hegh/heih etc. ‘HIGH’, huld and hild ‘HELD’, seh/seih/segh etc. ‘AW’, -leche, -ur, OE y in u/uy e.g. fuyre ‘FIRE’, ӡongþe ‘YOUTH’, eorþe ‘EARTH’” (1985, p. 272). Scribe D’s repertoire also includes some spellings Smith identifies as deriving from the Gower tradition (primarily forms marked as Kentish or East Anglian, associated with Gower’s family holdings in Kentwell, Suffolk and Otford, Kent; Samuels and Smith 1983, p. 17-20), including tuo TWO and oghne OWN. The first set of forms, Smith argues, reflect the scribe’s presumed SW Midlands (northwest Worcestershire or south Shropshire; 1985, p. 208) origins. Horobin and Mosser (2005) argue that “these forms derive instead from Scribe D’s persistent use of Western exemplars.