SEARCH RECORDS

INTRODUCTION
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
NOTATIONAL CONVENTIONS
UNTRACED MANUSCRIPTS
SCRIBE B=ADAM PINKHURST
SCRIBE D=JOHN MARCHAUNT
THE HAMMOND SCRIBE
THE “HOOKED-g” SCRIBES
THE PETWORTH SCRIBE
THE BERYN SCRIBE
BIBLIOGRAPHY
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A Digital Catalogue of the
Pre-1500 Manuscripts and Incunables of the
Canterbury Tales
Second Edition
THE BERYN SCRIBE
The “Beryn Scribe” is so-called because he is the copyist of the only copy of the Tale of Beryn, found in:
1. Northumberland MS 455 (Nl): Canterbury Tales
Mooney and Matheson (2003) have identified the “Beryn Scribe’s” hand in seven MSS in addition to Nl:
2. London, British Library, MS Harley 1337: Middle English prose Brut
3. London, British Library, MS Harley 62517: Middle English prose Brut
4. Ann Arbor, University of Michigan, Hatcher Library, MS 225: Middle English prose Brut (the Beryn Scribe copies fols. 1r-29v; 108r (line 22)-135r)
5. Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Hatton 50: Middle English prose Brut (the Beryn Scribe copies fols. 2-17v; 84v-107r; 119r-130v)
6. Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Tanner 11: Middle English prose Brut (the Beryn Scribe copies pp. 1-116; p. 164, lines 28-31; pp. 205 (line 4)-209 (line 3)
7. Cambridge University Library, MS Kk.1.3, part 10: Lydgate’s Life of Our Lady
8. Oxford, St. John’s College, MS 57: three booklets containing the Prick of Conscience; a fifteenth-century Chronicle of London; Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls, and Henry V’s Statutes and Ordinances for the army at Mantes (1419)
Simon Horobin identified the scribe of the paper section of He as the Beryn Scribe on the basis of paleographical and linguistic features. Mooney and Mosser, with the assistance of Don C. Skemer, Curator of Manuscripts at the Firestone Library, have identified the Beryn Scribe’s hand throughout He.note
9. Princeton University, Firestone Library MS 100 (Helmingham): Canterbury Tales
10. Oxford, Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson C.901: Middle English prose Brut (see Mosser and Mooney 2014)
11. Ox¹ (Manchester, John Rylands Library English MS 63)+Ox² (Rosenbach MS 1084/2): Canterbury Tales (see Mosser and Mooney 2014)
LANGUAGE
Although there is some variability in the Beryn Scribe’s spellings, key diagnostic forms occur in all or many of the MSS attributed to him: white WIGHT; whils/whilis WHILE; unetymological initial h-; such SUCH; strengith STRENGTH; frequent -it for -ED (pret.); scl- for SL-; yeur YOUR; ӡewe YOU; oppon UPON; v for etymological w (especially in “woman,” “women,” “wives,” and “womb”); PLACE, GRACE, FACE are spelled with -ase; TRUTH, YOUTH, and the ‑ETH 3rd person, singular, present tense morpheme are spelled trowith, yowith, goith, etc. While LALME LP 6040 localizes the language of the Nl scribe to southern Essex, the language of He is even more markedly East Anglian.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Horobin, Simon. “The Scribe of the Helmingham and Northumberland Manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales.” Neophilologus 84 (2000): 457-65. [facsimile of fol. 88r in Nl; facsimile of fol. 77 v in He]
Mooney, Linne R., and Lister M. Matheson. “The Beryn Scribe and his Texts: Evidence for Multiple-Copy Production of Manuscripts in Fifteenth-Century England.” The Library Seventh Series, vol. 4 (2003): 347-70. [facsimiles of fol. 180r in Nl and of the scribe’s work in Cambridge University Library, MS Kk.1.3, part 10, fols. 4r and 12r]
Manly, John M., and Edith Rickert, eds. The Text of the Canterbury Tales: Studied on the Basis of All Known Manuscripts. 8 vols. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1940. 1:387-95.
McCormick, Sir William and Janet E. Heseltine. The Manuscripts of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales: A Critical Description of Their Contents. Oxford: Clarendon, 1933. 369-78.
Mosser, Daniel W. and Linne R. Mooney. “More Manuscripts by the Beryn Scribe and His Cohort.” Chaucer Review 49 (2014): 39-76. 
McIntosh, Angus, M. L. Samuels, and Michael Benskin, eds. A Linguistic Atlas of Late Mediaeval English. 4 vols. Aberdeen: Aberdeen Univ. Press, 1986. LP 6040 (Nl).